Day: May 21, 2018

What You Should Be Asking Your Pulmonologist?

What You Should Be Asking Your Pulmonologist?

There are instances where scans and other tests do not return the most favourable of results. In such instances, many patients find themselves more preoccupied with the negative result and tend to forget to properly question their pulmonologist as to what exactly the result entails – and since the specialist will most likely schedule a later appointment to discuss the future treatment methods and plans, this often means that the patient will either worry himself or herself, or self-diagnose themselves, which are both not the healthiest recourses of action. This is why you should take the time to properly ask your pulmonologist a few questions before he or she ends your appointment; here are some of the basic question you would do best to ask:

  • What exactly is tested by the test? – this is a question that you should actually be asking your respiratory physician Brisbane before your test, but if you did not get the chance to, or simply forgot to, another good opportunity to make the question is once you get your results back. Keep in mind that there are many different tests and scans in each field of medicine, and there is a vast number of different disorders associated with them. Understanding what a specific test or scan is meant to reveal can give you a better insight into what a result would reflect.
  • What are the possible diagnoses of a negative or positive result? – depending on the specific terminology being used, an unfavourable result can either be shown as a positive or negative value, or a numeric value. Regardless of how the result is shown, make sure to ask the doctor what an abnormality in the test result can possibly mean. As was mentioned above, a test can be associated with more than one disorder, meaning that a negative result can lead to more than one answer, often unless it is supplemented by further tests (and this is also why you might have to come back on a later day to find the exact diagnosis).
  • Is a second opinion recommended? – when it comes to specific disorders, most commonly cancer and tumours, medical practitioners will likely advise you to get a second opinion, even if you yourself were not planning to. Whilst you really do not need to ask your doctor if you are planning to get a second opinion at a managed specialist practice centre or hospital or hospital facility, it might be a good idea to ask if you were not planning to.
  • What can you expect next? – and finally, do not forget to ask the doctor on what he or she plans to do next. Will you be prescribed medications or will you have to go through further testing? Is there specific advice that you might have to follow, or any specific changes you may have to make to your current lifestyle?  Go right here to find out more details.